Djingalla moves in old age


Music is a particularly effective contribution to maintaining and promoting the mental and physical mobility of older people. Positive music experiences provide simple creative impulses and joie de vivre for the everyday life in day care and retirement homes - the antidepressive effect of music, movement and singing has been known for a long time.

 

Music can elicit surprising improvements of communication skills in dementia sufferers and promotes social integration. Researchers found that the ability to think is stimulated by music as well.

Djingalla supports and promotes the joy of singing and dancing that is present in many old people.

The interrelation of music, movement and singing reinforces the effect of activation and increases cognitive skills.

 

Options for realization

IN A SEATED POSITION

- Singing traditional songs together "Djingalla | Dance and Song" (instrumental

   music)

- Taking up ideas for movements to the music

- Colourful chiffon cloths which can be used in a seated position as well

- Playing with simple percussion instruments

- Rhythmic impulses for coordination and communication

- Realizing small simple dance stories with different materials    

- Singing or humming verses together

- Clapping your hands / clapping on your legs / stomping your feet or swinging colourful chiffon cloths

 

 

Music and Dementia | "Musik macht geistig fit" | Publisher Prof. Dr. Bernd Fischer:

If physical exercises (sitting down) are accompanied by music, the participation rate of dementia sufferers increased significantly over the course of 25 weeks. (Mathews et al. 2001)

 

Furthermore, the participation rate increased when the exercises were accompanied not by singing but by pure instrumental music. (Cevasco et al. 2003)

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Musical activities, especially singing, can strengthen cognitive abilities and improve the mood of dementia patients. This was discovered by researchers at the University of Helsinki. Their study appeared in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

 


Dezember 2018

 New CD